LABORATORY NEWS
Research Opportunity from NIJ

New solicitation from NIJ calls for research and development in forensic science for criminal justice purposes.

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Live Training Today: Analyzing Gunshot Residue

Can gunshot residue travel through glass as a bullet breaks a window? ... Why was Manganese observed when a bullet hit body armor?

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3D Footprints: Making a Positive Impression

-Sponsored- As with many other forms of physical evidence, footprints have long been recognized as an important piece of crime scene evidence. So long as gravity remains a factor at crime scenes, footprints will forever remain a commonly found piece of evidence. Although at times they may be difficult to interpret due to a difficult substrate or distortion in the print, they are still a valuable piece of evidence to tie a suspect to a particular crime.

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Detecting Erased Markings in Firearms

Using new magneto-optical (MO) sensor technology could be one way for firearm examiners to detect and restore erased markings in firearms without destroying the weapon. A recording of NIJ’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence roundtable on the effectiveness of MO sensor technology is now available online.

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Getting Research into Practice

A new NIJ program is giving funds to help researchers disseminate their work to practitioners.

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New Report Focuses on Fire Debris Analysis

A new technical report, Interpretation of Ignitable Liquid Residues in Fire Debris Analysis: Effects of Competitive Adsorption, Development of an Expert System and Assessment of the False Positive/Incorrect Assignment Rate (pdf, 153 pages), was recently released by NIJ through the National Criminal Justice Reference Service.

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Product News

Six interchangeable LED lamps

highlight the features of the OPTIMAX Multi-Lite Forensic Inspection Kit from Spectronics Corporation. This portable kit is designed for crime-scene investigation, gathering evidence, and work in the forensic laboratory. The LEDs provide six single-wavelength light sources, each useful for specific applications, from bodily fluids to fingerprints. The wavelengths are: UV-A (365 nm), blue (450 nm), green (525 nm), amber (590 nm), red (630 nm), and white light (400-700 nm). The cordless flashlight weighs only 15 oz. To learn more, go to: www.spectroline.com

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