LABORATORY NEWS
Hair Dye 'CSI' Could Help Police Solve Crimes

Criminals with a penchant for dyeing their hair could soon pay for their vanity. Scientists have found a way to analyze hair samples at crime scenes to rapidly determine whether it was colored and what brand of dye was used. Their report appears in the American Chemical Society journal Analytical Chemistry.

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National Certification and Accreditation Recommendations

At the fifth meeting of the National Commission on Forensic Science, January 29-30, 2015, in Washington, DC, saw the final drafts of three policy recommendations regarding certification and accreditation in forensic science.

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Research Opportunity from NIJ

New solicitation from NIJ calls for research and development in forensic science for criminal justice purposes.

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Live Training Today: Analyzing Gunshot Residue

Can gunshot residue travel through glass as a bullet breaks a window? ... Why was Manganese observed when a bullet hit body armor?

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3D Footprints: Making a Positive Impression

-Sponsored- As with many other forms of physical evidence, footprints have long been recognized as an important piece of crime scene evidence. So long as gravity remains a factor at crime scenes, footprints will forever remain a commonly found piece of evidence. Although at times they may be difficult to interpret due to a difficult substrate or distortion in the print, they are still a valuable piece of evidence to tie a suspect to a particular crime.

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Detecting Erased Markings in Firearms

Using new magneto-optical (MO) sensor technology could be one way for firearm examiners to detect and restore erased markings in firearms without destroying the weapon. A recording of NIJ’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence roundtable on the effectiveness of MO sensor technology is now available online.

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New Books

Bloodstain Pattern Analysis

Most forensic disciplines attempt to determine the “who” of a crime. But bloodstain pattern analysis focuses on the “what happened” part of a crime. This book is the third edition of Blood-stain Pattern Analysis. The authors explore the topic in depth, explaining what it is, how it is used, and the practical methodologies that are employed to achieve defensible results. It offers practical, common-sense advice and tips for both novices and professionals. www.crcpress.com

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