Crime Scene Revisited

To get to the bottom of a case, just keep your eyes open.

There was an armed robbery last year in Sturgis, Michigan. At the crime scene, CSIs from Sturgis found an interesting footwear impression and took steps to collect a casting before the changing weather conditions could ruin it. Within a short time after the robbery, Michigan State Police Troopers stopped a suspect vehicle in a nearby jurisdiction. Three suspects were arrested. They had footwear that was similar to two of the impressions found at the scene. Once on station, the officers noticed an impression in the cast that was unidentified but unique. Upon comparing it with one of the suspect’s foot-wear, they found part of a screw imbedded in the bottom of the shoe—and that screw matched the unique impression in the cast. A photo of the shoe with the screw in place and a photo of the impression (both shown above) were laid out before the suspect during the interview. He immediately confessed.

Submitted by David Ives, Deputy Chief, Sturgis (Michigan) Police Department

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ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED:
"Crime Scene Revisited"
November-December 2008 (Volume 6, Number 6)
Evidence Technology Magazine
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Forensic Podiatry (Part Two of Two)

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