Editorial: So Much More

We are now three issues deep into our switch to a full-digital publication. We have heard from a few of you who miss the print edition (so do we), but there are so many advantages to this format—not the least of which is the amount of information we are able to pack into each issue.

Gone are the days when I had to make tough decisions about cutting or bumping articles, simply due to space considerations. When an article runs long, I don’t need to take out my red pen and start deleting details. If there are a lot of illustrations, I now have the luxury of adding a few more pages to accommodate the space they require.

 
As a result of this new-found freedom, you’ll notice this is the largest issue of Evidence Technology Magazine that we have ever produced. It’s 55 pages long, with eight feature articles covering myriad aspects of forensic science, from standard and guideline development (Page 50) to wildlife crime scene management (Page 14), and from sizing digital images (Page 24) to automated license plate recognition (Page 40).
 
The new digital format allows us to stretch our editorial legs and bring you an even more educational publication than it was before we phased out print.
 
We look forward to continuing this service—completely free to everyone, anywhere in the world—for another decade and beyond. To help us reach even more people, please be sure that your own subscription is up to date, and pass along the subscription link to your colleagues so they can enjoy the bigger and improved digital-only Evidence Technology Magazine. Here’s that link:
 
 
Thank you, as always, for your readership.
 
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Evidence Technology Magazine
 
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Court Case Update

FINGERPRINT EVIDENCE went through a nearly three-year ordeal in the New Hampshire court system, but eventually emerged unscathed. On April 4, 2008, the New Hampshire Supreme Court unanimously reversed the decision of a lower court to exclude expert testimony regarding fingerprint evidence in the case of The State of New Hampshire v. Richard Langill. The case has been remanded back to the Rockingham County Superior Court.

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