In Memoriam: Gary E. Gulick
Written by Kristi Mayo   

On September 27, 2020, Evidence Technology Magazine co-founder Gary Gulick—my business partner, mentor, friend… my dad—passed away at his home in Kearney, Missouri at the age of 82. In the intervening weeks, I have written his obituary for the local papers, looked through old photos, laughed, and cried. And now I am attempting to write one last tribute in the pages of this magazine, the creation that brought him a sense of immense pride.


Gary E. Gulick
1938 – 2020

The idea for Evidence Technology Magazine grew out of Gary’s experience writing catalogs, newsletters, and other marketing materials for the Lynn Peavey Company, a manufacturer of crime scene and forensic supplies located in Lenexa, Kansas. I grew up listening to Gary talk about superglue fuming and fingerprint powders. Of course, I listened to him talk about a lot of other things, because his interests and experiences were incredibly varied, and he always immersed himself in whatever topic came across his desk.

Gary began his career in advertising as a copywriter in the mid-1960s. One of the first major accounts that he worked on was Beech Aircraft, and while researching the industry, he fell in love with aviation. His work kept him around a lot of pilots and small aircraft, so he used the opportunity to learn to fly.

Later, after launching his freelance career, Gary worked on a number of industrial accounts, including manufacturers in the road-construction industry. I spent part of my childhood accompanying him on photo missions to asphalt plants and learning the finer details of milling machines and road pavers.

And then, of course, there was the crime scene stuff. My dad’s work on the Lynn Peavey newsletter, The Daily Hound, helped put me through college—so I guess I figured the least I could do once I graduated was help him with his marketing business. In 2001 I left the University of Missouri–Kansas City (of which Gary and I are both alumni) with a degree in Creative Writing and Journalism, set up a desk in my dad’s basement home office, and went to work for The Wordsmith.

Then 9/11 happened. Business slowed. Gary and I found ourselves with some extra time on our hands. So, this little idea that he and I had both been kicking around for a few years gradually solidified itself into a real, living, breathing magazine. In May 2003, we launched Evidence Technology Magazine. With his hand firmly planted in the center of my back, Gary pushed me toward the helm as Editor in Chief, while he assumed the role of Publisher. We moved out of that home office into a real office-building suite. He gave me the corner office.

We knew very little about publishing a magazine—only enough, he would say, to get ourselves into trouble. But our fledgling publication grabbed a foothold, was embraced by the crime scene and forensic science community, and somehow found its way ahead. More than 17 years later, Evidence Technology Magazine is still plugging along.

If it seems this In Memoriam has turned into a Brief History of Evidence Technology Magazine, there’s a good reason for that: This is the story Gary would have told. He was so proud of this thing that we created, together. I’m proud of it, too. And I’m proud of him.

And wow. I’m going to miss him.

-30-

 
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