News from the Field

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National Center for Media Forensics at University of Colorado Denver
grows degree offerings, course offerings, and capabilities

The National Center for Media Forensics (NCMF)—part of the Department of Music & Entertainment Industry Studies, College of Arts & Media, at the University of Colorado Denver—launched its new graduate program in media forensics this fall. The initiation of the program is just the beginning for the NCMF, which offers a new source for research and training in the field of forensic video and audio analysis.

“This is the only master’s level program in the country that focuses solely on the forensic analysis of video and audio media evidence,” said NCMF Associate Director Jeff Smith in a July press release.

Founded in 2008, the NCMF has received more than $1 million in federal funding. Its graduate program provides hands-on training in audio, video, and computer forensics methods and applications. The NCMF is also an associate member of the Scientific Working Group on Digital Evidence (SWGDE), and is supported through congressional earmarks overseen by the Bureau of Justice Assistance and the National Institute of Justice.

To equip its forensic-video laboratory, the NCMF recently acquired a complete, turnkey dTective Forensic Video, Image and Audio Analysis System, along with additional copies of ClearID forensic image clarification software—all from Ocean Systems.

Training opportunity
for law enforcement

In addition to providing a Master’s of Science in Recording Arts emphasis in Media Forensics, the NCMF provides training opportunities for law enforcement through credit-bearing workshops that deal with forensic media analysis. The first of these offerings, titled Audio Forensics Workshop, will be held at the NCMF laboratory in Denver, Colorado, December 13-15, 2010. The course is an introduction to digital audio, acoustics, audio evidence admissibility, and recorded speech enhancement. According to NCMF Director Dr. Catalin Grigoras, this course is designed to be “the perfect experience for those new to the field, practitioners needing to review forensic audio theory and practice, or those accustomed to working with other types of digital and multimedia evidence.”

Course topics include an introduction to media forensics; the foundations for forensic audio enhancement; and the demonstration and practice of seizing, enhancing, and documenting audio as evidence.

To learn more about the course, contact NCMF Administrative Manager Leah Haloin at: This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

Click here to view the NCMF website.


ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED:
"News from the Field," written by ETM Staff
September-October 2010 (Volume 8, Number 5)
Evidence Technology Magazine
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