New website lists programs that work

A government website launched last week rates the usefulness of programs that are intended to help practitioners and policymakers who work in criminal justice, juvenile justice, and crime-victim services.

 

The site, www.crimesolutions.gov, was officially announced by the Department of Justice’s Office of Justice Programs (OJP) on June 22. This new website includes information on more than 150 justice-related programs and assigns "evidence ratings"—effective, promising, or no effects—to indicate whether there is evidence from research that a program achieves its goals.

"We all have tight budgets today. CrimeSolutions.gov helps us take a 'smart on crime' approach that relies on data-driven, evidence-based analysis to identify and replicate justice-related programs that have shown real results in preventing and reducing crime and serving crime victims," explained Laurie O. Robinson, Assistant Attorney General.

CrimeSolutions.gov is a searchable online database of evidence-based programs covering a range of justice-related topics, including corrections; courts; crime prevention; substance abuse; juveniles; law enforcement; technology and forensics; and victims. The site is a tool to understand, access, and integrate scientific evidence about programs into programmatic and policy decisions.

The new website is part of the Evidence Integration Initiative (E2I) launched by Assistant Attorney General Robinson in 2009. The Initiative's three goals are improving the quantity and quality of evidence OJP generates; integrating evidence into program, practice, and policy decisions within OJP and the field; and improving the translation of evidence into practice.

 

 
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