Collecting DNA from Juveniles

Through the National Criminal Justice Reference Service, NIJ has made available a final technical report, Collecting DNA from Juveniles, by Julie E. Samuels, Allison M. Dwyer, Robin Halberstadt, and Pamela Lachman.

This report examines the laws, policies, and practices related to juvenile DNA collection, as well as their implications for the juvenile and criminal justice systems. This report considers the following questions:

1. How have state agencies, including juvenile justice agencies and state
laboratories, implemented juvenile DNA collection laws?

2. What are the number and characteristics of juveniles with profiles included in CODIS?

3. How have juvenile profiles in CODIS contributed to public safety or other justice outcomes?

4. What improvements to policies and practices should be made?

This report is the result of an NIJ-funded project but was not published by the U.S. Department of Justice.

You can download the report as a PDF here.

 
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Court Case Update

FINGERPRINT EVIDENCE went through a nearly three-year ordeal in the New Hampshire court system, but eventually emerged unscathed. On April 4, 2008, the New Hampshire Supreme Court unanimously reversed the decision of a lower court to exclude expert testimony regarding fingerprint evidence in the case of The State of New Hampshire v. Richard Langill. The case has been remanded back to the Rockingham County Superior Court.

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