Learning life from death

Death may be the inevitable end of life, but for a group of forensic anthropologists and advanced college students, it is the beginning of important, groundbreaking research.

The Southeast Texas Applied Forensic Science Facility is one of only four educational facilities in the country that studies the natural decay and decomposition of human remains in a variety of environmental conditions.

“There is order after death,” said Dr. Joan Bytheway, director of STAFS. “Everything has a purpose – nature is remarkably efficient.”

Read the full article here

—Written by Brad Meyer

 
< Prev   Next >






Digital-Image Management at Mass Gravesites

SKELETONIZED REMAINS that were carefully unearthed from the desert sands of Iraq tell their own story: the bones of an adult, still dressed in a woman’s apparel, lie supine. The skull is perforated by a bullet hole. Tucked in the space between the ribs and the left humerus is a much smaller skeleton, bones in the skull un-fused, and the fully clothed body partially swaddled in a blanket.

Read more...